NIH RADx initiative advances six new COVID-19 testing technologies

The National Institutes of Health, working in collaboration with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), today announced a third round of contract awards for scale-up and manufacturing of new COVID-19 testing technologies.

Ellume/Luminostics

The six new Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative contracts total $98.35 million for point-of-care and other novel test approaches that provide new modes of sample collection, processing and return of results. Innovations in these new technologies include integration with smart devices, mobile-lab processing that can be deployed to COVID-19 hot spots, and test results available within minutes.

These awards are part of the RADx Tech program, focused on rapidly advancing early testing technologies. RADx Tech and the RADx Advanced Technology Platforms (RADx-ATP) —the latter for late-stage scale-up projects— are now supporting a combined portfolio of 22 companies for a total of $476.4 million in manufacturing expansion contracts. These six additional technologies are expected to add as many as 500,000 tests per day to the U.S. capacity by the end of 2020 and 1 million tests per day by early 2021. Combined with previous contracts announced in July and September, RADx Tech and RADx-ATP contracts are expected to increase test capacity by 2.7 million tests per day by the end of 2020.

“Since launching in April, the NIH RADx initiative has moved swiftly to facilitate critical expansion of early and late-stage testing technologies as well as research to remove barriers to testing for underserved and vulnerable populations,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “Each of the technologies emerging from the RADx initiative will play a critical role in extending accessibility to testing in diverse settings.”

The latest group of testing technologies have been optimized and assessed within the NIH RADx Tech development pipeline and have met the rigorous criteria for advancement. Factors such as speed, accuracy, cost and accessibility are key considerations for RADx support. The RADx initiative provides financial support and expertise to help companies reach milestones for U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorization, scale-up and commercialization.

“The current round of awards support five technologies that can be delivered to the point of care and a powerful laboratory test,” said Bruce J. Tromberg, Ph.D., director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) and lead for RADx Tech, one of four programs of the NIH RADx initiative. “The technologies include an antigen test that provides results in 15 minutes, a viral RNA test deployed in mobile vans that can travel to COVID hotspots and tests that require only saliva, nasal swabs or blood from a finger prick.”

BARDA, part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provided the funding for these RADx Tech contracts from emergency supplemental appropriations to the Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund.

BARDA has contributed substantially to the nation’s COVID testing capacity with development support of 30 SARS-COV-2 diagnostic tests since March, 15 of which have achieved FDA emergency use authorization (EUA). Five of the 30 tests can distinguish between influenza and SARS-COV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, from the same sample, and two of those have achieved EUA. To date, BARDA’s industry partners have shipped more than 45 million tests to healthcare providers across the country.

“Through the RADx initiative, we are expanding on our long-standing partnership with NIH to bring essential technology to the American people in the fight against COVID-19,” said BARDA Acting Director Gary L. Disbrow, Ph.D. “Our staff at BARDA is lending our expertise and experience in advanced development, manufacturing and scale up to help make as many accurate, fast tests available as we can as quickly as possible.” 



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